Portland is Behind on Issuing Cannabis Business Licenses

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With only a few weeks to go until the Oregon Health Authority officially turns the new commercial cannabis industry over to the Oregon Liquor Control Commission there is not much time left for businesses to obtain all their needed licenses. In the city of Portland there have been delays in the permit process for several cannabis businesses – who were worried that they would be shut down come January 1st when those licenses become required. Luckily, the Portland City Council has taken action to ensure that businesses awaiting licenses will not have action taken against them at start of the new year.

“There was some concern in the media about lots of businesses being found out of compliance and shut down January 1,” Commissioner Amanda Fritz said. “As long as there are good faith efforts that they’re in the process that is not going to happen. We appreciate most businesses are working their way through the process”

In hopes of speeding up the process some, the council also agreed that retail dispensaries will be able to obtain their licenses from the Office of Neighborhood Involvement – even if they are still in the process of obtaining all the permits they need. As long as they get the permits and have been successful in working through the complicated process, then they will be eligible to get their license ahead of schedule. This will not however, be an option for growers or processors – likely due to the fact that there are much more in depth inspections required for such businesses.

“We want to be very clear that the city and the Cannabis Policy Program will not be taking enforcement measures against any legally operating marijuana business that is currently waiting in line for its recreational license to be issued,” Fritz said at the top of the Council meeting.

Along with the measure that aims to help push along the licensing of retail cannabusinesses, the city council also approved a measure that will allow for a new license – for marijuana couriers. Such a license wouldn’t allow businesses to have a retail storefront – but it would allow them to have a headquarters, receive orders between 8am and 8pm, and make deliveries of cannabis up until 9pm. This is a first of its kind license – headquarters would have to remain 1,000 feet away from schools like any other cannabis business, but they would be able to deliver to homes that are closer.

It’s exciting to see the city coming to the end of a long initial process that has created what will likely be a thriving industry – and bringing new opportunities, such as the new licenses for marijuana couriers. Both of these measures will be voted on a second time next week before they are officially passed, but both seem to be extremely well supported and it is unlikely there will be any issue.

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